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Early Defibrillation…

…is the Key to Survival – and Anyone Can Do It!

Sudden Cardiac Arrest can happen anywhere, anytime, to anybody, without warning! But with minimal expense, you can drastically increase the odds of saving the life of someone who suffers a sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) on your premises, or in your community. According to the American Heat Association, the annual number of deaths in the United States resulting from sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) outside a hospital is 330,000.

Imagine the Power to Save a Life! Thanks to a new generation of affordable, easy-to-use, and extremely portable defibrillators, people are implementing automated external defibrillator (AED) programs where they work and live.

Automated external defibrillators (AEDs) provide precise therapy for sudden cardiac arrest by delivering an electrical waveform, or more simply, a shock to the heart to restore a normal heart rhythm. This treatment must be delivered within a 3 to 7 minute window of opportunity to provide a meaningful chance of survival. While cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can keep oxygenated blood flowing to the body’s vital organs, only an electric shock can help reset the heart to its normal rhythm and save the person’s life. For every minute that passes without CPR and defibrillation, the chances of survival decrease by 7–10% The U.S. survival rate from SCA is dismal… less than 5 percent! The reason; victims cannot be defibrillated in time.
The American Heart Association believes that as many as 50,000 lives could be saved each year if defibrillation were more widely performed. Early defibrillation with an automated external defibrillator (AED) more than doubles a victim’s chance of survival.

AEDs are designed specifically for the first responder at an emergency… typically a layperson. The U.S. survival rate is expected to increase dramatically with the expanded awareness and placement of AEDs. Amazingly, 64% of Americans have never even seen an AED.

Defibrillation

The use of an electrical device (defibrillator) to give an electric shock to the heart to help restore a normal heartbeat. It is used for dangerous arrhythmias, such as ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation, and in cardiac arrest.

 

Sudden Cardiac Death (SCD, Sudden Death

SCD is death resulting from the abrupt loss of heart function (cardiac arrest). Death occurs within minutes after the heart stops. SCD due to cardiac arrest may be prevented if CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) is performed and a defibrillator is used to shock the heart and restore a normal heart rhythm within a few minutes. Most of the cardiac arrests that lead to sudden death occur when the electrical impulses in the diseased heart become rapid (ventricular tachycardia) or chaotic (ventricular fibrillation) or both. A heart attack may cause cardiac arrest and sudden cardiac death, but the terms aren’t synonymous

 

Cardiac Arrest

Cardiac arrest is the sudden, abrupt loss of heart function. It’s also called sudden cardiac arrest or unexpected cardiac arrest. Most cardiac arrests occur when the electrical impulses in the diseased heart become rapid (ventricular tachycardia) or chaotic (ventricular fibrillation) or both. This irregular heart rhythm (arrhythmia) causes the heart to suddenly stop beating. Cardiac arrest can be reversed if it’s treated within a few minutes with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and an electric shock (defibrillation) to the heart to restore a normal heartbeat. Sudden cardiac death (SCD) occurs within minutes after symptoms appear unless cardiac arrest is reversed. The term “massive heart attack” is often wrongly used in the media to describe sudden death from cardiac arrest. The term “heart attack” refers to death of heart muscle tissue due to the loss of blood supply, not necessarily resulting in a cardiac arrest or the death of the heart attack victim. A heart attack may cause cardiac arrest and sudden cardiac death, but the terms aren’t synonymous.

 

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